6. Getting off the YEC bandwagon

Just earlier today, someone told me that he believed that a literal interpretation of Genesis is a salvation issue after all.  I have only known this person for a few months and when we first talked about this, he told me that he did not think it was a salvation issue.  However, in talking with him further, it soon became apparent that he did.  Statements such as, “If we don’t believe in a literal Genesis, then we might as well throw out the whole Bible” strongly suggest that the speaker does consider it a salvation issue.  I can’t see how a person who subscribes to this view could say that it is not.  I mean, come right out and say so!  So, if anything, I’m glad this person has finally decided to admit that it is.

And that, my friends, is where I get off the bus.

A god that is limited to our puny minds’ literal reading of Genesis is not worthy of my time, let alone my worship.

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Posted on Sunday, May 23rd, 2010, in Creation vs Evolution, Religion and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. 5 Comments.

  1. “Statements such as, “If we don’t believe in a literal Genesis, then we might as well throw out the whole Bible” strongly suggest that the speaker does consider it a salvation issue.”

    Why? Yes, it’s a salvation issue in the sense that it might cause someone to reject Christianity, but it’s not a salvation issue in the sense that one can’t be a Christian and believe evolution. You have confused the two ideas.

    “A god that is limited to our puny minds’ literal reading of Genesis is not worthy of my time, let alone my worship.”

    What about a God that says that the world was created in six days, when he actually took billions of years? Is such a god worthy of your worship?

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  2. ‘What about a God that says that the world was created in six days, when he actually took billions of years? Is such a god worthy of your worship?’

    Such a god would be a liar, yes?

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  3. Yes, such a God would appear to be a liar. So is such a god worthy of your worship?

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  4. A god that says he took six days (the way YECs claim*) when in fact he took billions of years – or gives the impression that he took billions of years – is a liar and I will not worship such a god. Would you?

    * ‘the way YECs claim’ is an important qualifier

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  5. “…the way YECs claim*…”

    So you’re now admitting that God is a YEC?

    If not, what do you mean by “the way YECs claim? After all, it was God who said,

    “Remember the Sabbath day by keeping it holy. Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is a Sabbath to the Lord your God. On it you shall not do any work, neither you, nor your son or daughter, nor your manservant or maidservant, nor your animals, nor the alien within your gates. For in six days the Lord made the heavens and the earth, the sea, and all that is in them, but he rested on the seventh day. Therefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day and made it holy.”

    That’s not a YEC claim; that’s God’s verbatim words (apart from it being translated into English). So if this is a YEC claim, then you are saying that God is a YEC (which of course He is!).

    This is not the only reason for believing that God took six day; it’s also quite clear from Genesis 1. But this is a very explicit and unambiguous claim, and one that is tied in with our seven-day week. So there is no reason whatsoever (apart from trying to accommodate secular philosophies) for understanding six days to mean anything other than ordinary days. And the statement could hardly be clearer that God created /everything/ in those six days.

    So what is there about this that could be described as “the way YECs claim”? Or is this simply a meaningless qualifier in order to create a crack through which one can smuggle in evolutionary views?

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