Cooking Around the World

This year, my youngest has been studying Eastern Hemisphere countries. To round off each topic, the student has to choose a project to do.

Here are some things she has done.

Pacific Islands
She cooked (with a bit of help) Ham and Pineapple Fried Rice and Mango Salsa. For dessert, Fakakai Topai (Dumplings in Sweet Coconut Sauce), a dish from Tonga.

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Australia

Lamingtons.

Confession: I have never made lamingtons from scratch. Years ago, someone on the homeschool forums tried making lamingtons for their Australian project. She posted pictures of their attempts where they had trouble coating the little pieces of cake evenly. The cakes came out all splotchy. She asked the Australians on the forums how we got our lamingtons evenly coated.

Without fail, every single Australian on the forum said, “We don’t make them; we just buy them at the shop.”

That said, Miss 10 and I did try to make lamingtons from scratch. It’s a lot of effort, and it really is easier to just buy them if you ever have a hankering for lamingtons.

Image may contain: food and indoor

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New Zealand

There is some controversy where pavlova — a meringue-based dessert topped with fruit and cream — originated. Some say it is Australia. Some say it is New Zealand. The Eastern Hemisphere workbook Miss 10 is working on says it is New Zealand. And the Oxford English Dictionary agrees with that.

Here is our feeble attempt. Everything was made from scratch and it is our very first attempt at making this oh-so-very-sweet dessert.

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Japan

Read Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes and tried our hand at some origami, including making cranes and working out how long it would take to fold one thousand of them.

One paper crane: Roughly three and a half minutes.
One thousand paper cranes: 3500 minutes (58.3 hours if done continuously without stopping!)

We didn’t take a photo of our paper cranes, but here are some other origami creations.

We live in an area where it is very convenient to buy “foreign” ingredients.

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Posted on Saturday, April 1st, 2017, in Cooking, Education, Home Schooling. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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