Category Archives: Fundamentalism

A Creation/Evolution Debate

On 26 September, 2015, I posted a link on my Facebook page: 10 Misconceptions About the Theory of Evolution.

The post has generated a long discussion. I am posting redacted parts of  it here now to make it easier to read. I welcome readers to add their thoughts to the discussion.

I apologise for the length of this article!

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Dear YEC Friend – #13 A Matter of Interpretation

A continuation of a series of letters I have written to a fictitious young-Earth Creationist friend. While the ‘Friend’ is fictitious, it is based on observations of, and interactions with, people who hold young-Earth ideas.

You can click on the Category Letters to My Young Earth Creationist Friend or go to the Page to find more.

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Dear Friend,

I think the main reason why YECs find the idea of an old earth — and its cousin, evolution — to be illogical is that it is incongruous with their interpretation of the Bible. So committed are they to their particular interpretation of the Bible, that it is difficult for them to see things any other way.

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Dear YEC Friend – #12 The Bible Tells Me So

A continuation of a series of letters I have written to a fictitious young-Earth Creationist friend. While the ‘Friend’ is fictitious, it is based on observations of and interactions with people who hold young-Earth ideas.

You can click on the Category Letters to My Young Earth Creationist Friend or go to the Page to find more.

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Dear Friend,

“Compromising Christians”

In response to my last letter,  you said that there is no room for “maybe”.  God told us how he created life, the universe and everything in it very clearly in His Word. If you opened the door to allow for even the idea that the earth could be more than 6000 years old, you could no longer be a consistent Christian.

I see that Ken Ham (and his cronies) have done their job well in convincing their followers of the Dogma of Young-Earth Creationism™ . He calls people like me “compromisers”. I guess that means people who have no integrity, who aren’t intellectually honest. The “official” stance is that it isn’t a salvation issue, but I don’t think anyone is fooled. Oh, yeah, you told me once it is a salvation issue. I’m glad you are able to be honest enough to say it.

To you, not interpreting Genesis (and passages that allude or refer to it) literally is “fracturing” God’s Word. I have already addressed this issue, so I won’t rehash it here. Many YECs have been taught that if Genesis 1-11 isn’t straight history, then Christianity isn’t true. Unfortunately, this kind of teaching is not winning any souls to Christ. In fact, it is turning people away. It is turning a lot of Christians into atheists. YECism is doing the opposite of what it intends to do!

And that is why I think YECism is a dangerous doctrine. It requires believers to accept something as an integral part of the faith which is provably false!

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Review: Jonathan Park: Ep. 109 – Isle of No Return, Part I

I listened to this episode here.

For more Jonathan Park reviews, click here.

Background Information

The Jonathan Park CDs are produced by Creation Works. Through these CDs,  they hope to ‘provide children and adults with scientific evidence that is in harmony with the Word of God’.  [Which raises the questions, ‘What does “in harmony” mean?’ and ‘What do they do with scientific evidence that is not in harmony with the Word of God?’]

Tagline: This is our Father’s world, God created it; we can explore it, so live the adventure!

NOTE: The producers of this series neglect to reference their information in any form.  No references is ever given either on the CD or in the Study Guide for ANY information presented in the series.  Even the voice actors of the series are not given any credit anywhere.

Plot Summary:

The Creation Response Team accepts a challenge to a competition with the Explorer’s Society, which pits their creation worldview against this evolutionary team at an undisclosed location. But will the CRT’s snap decision lead them to victory, or defeat, as they fight to stay alive on Snake Island? (Taken from here.)

Review:

Overall, the story is somewhat engaging. I think it really depends on one’s tolerance for such stories AND one’s predisposition to like/dislike anything produced by a YEC organisation. Yes, I freely admit prejudice comes into play here.

Kendall Park, Jim Brenan, and Jonathan Park are on Ilha da Queimada Grande, a snake-infested island off the coast of Brazil. They are competing against a “Evolution” team. The team that makes its case — and survives — wins. How and why these people agree to go on such life-threatening adventures again and again — and bring children along — is a matter of suspending belief. The women and girls do not go along this time (phew!… I think).

As always, it is good to remember the basic premise of the creators/producers of this series. There are two — and only TWO — worldviews: Creation and Evolution.

Creation: The universe and everything in it was created by God over a six-day period about 6000 years ago. Genesis 1-11 is to be interpreted literally. Science must be done with the Bible in mind. We know scientific findings are correct when they agree with the Bible. If they do not agree with the Bible, it means we are not interpreting the evidence correctly. Creationists are godly and GOOD.

Evolution: A man-made theory about how life, the universe, and everything came about through random, chance processes over millions of years in an attempt to disprove God. Anything and everything that does not agree with a literal interpretation of Genesis 1-11 is lumped as “Evolution”. People who believe in evolution are called “Evolutionists” and are, at best, misguided, and at worst, EVIL.

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Thoughtful Thursday: Answer This, Creationists!

One of the blogs I enjoy reading is God of Evolution.

His latest post is entitled 10 Theological Questions No Young-Earth Creationist Can Answer.  While I think the word “no” in the title might be slightly off — in his blogpost, he does mention some YECs attempts at some answers — the article is pretty spot-on. Perhaps a more accurate title would be: 10 Theological Questions No Young-Earth Creationists Can Answer Satisfactorily.

If you are not familiar with Tyler Franke’s style of writing, be prepared for some pithy humour which may, or may not, border on snarky depending on your tolerance level.

In summary, here are the questions:

1. What was the point of the tree of life?
2. If human sin is the reason animals die, why can’t they be saved?
3. If physical death is part of the punishment for sin, why do Christians still die?
4. Why was Eve named “mother of life”?
5. How did Adam and Eve know what death was?
6. If the punishment for eating from the tree was that Adam and Eve would physically die … why didn’t they physically die?
7. Can you name any other piece of literature in which the existence of a talking snake and trees with magical powers would suggest to you that it was meant to be taken literally?
8. Why do Genesis 1 and 2 contradict?
9. Why is incest wrong?
10. And finally, if it is so vitally important that Christians take Genesis literally, why did Jesus never once instruct us to take Genesis literally?

Moody Monday: What’s the Deal with the Duggars?

I first heard of the Duggars when they appeared on a television special. There they stood all in a row in age order, smartly and modestly dressed, saying their names one by one for the camera. The youngest one or two at the time were too young to say their names, so one of the parents spoke for them and Michelle ended the lineup by putting an affectionate hand on her belly and said, “…and this is Jackson!”

They looked like such a sweet, adorable, Christian family! And they home schooled!!

What was there not to like?

Quite a bit, as it turns out.

At first I thought they looked so nice. A bit weird in the fashion department, but okay.

Later, I learned that they home schooled with Bill Gothard’s Advanced Training Institute materials. Warning bells. And that they subscribed to Christian Patriarchy and all that entails. Huge warning bells. And then the television show that put them in the limelight. You know the tune.

“They’re a clean, wholesome family,” people said.

“The Duggars are upholding good, conservative, Christian values,” people said.

“I’d rather watch the Duggars than all that other junk that is on TV,” people said.

“The children are modest, well-behaved, role models,” people said.

Let’s talk about that. (Cue the “Good Mythical Morning” music. Or the “Twilight Zone” theme. Take your pick. I recommend the latter.)

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Jonathan Park

The  Jonathan Park Audio Adventure Series, originally created by the Institute for Creation Research, and then produced by Vision Forum Ministries before they closed down, is now produced by Creation Works.

This the screenshot that welcomes you:

Can You Feel the Love?

Watch Out, Evolution Bullies! Here Come the Creationists! 37,000 Familes (sic)!

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Sundry Sunday: New Blogs to Follow

A couple of blogs that I have, in the last couple of months, started following and enjoy reading very much.

God of Evolution

Tyler Francke is the man behind this blog which focuses mainly on the Creation/Evolution debate. He is an evangelical Christian and finds no conflict between the theory of evolution and Christianity and he blogs about it. He takes a good swipe at Ken Ham (and others like him) with unparalleled good humour which I find refreshing. Hey, if you’re going to fight your opponents, might as well do it with style, right?

God of Evolution racked up over 300,000 views for 2014 — a staggering number considering that the blog is run by one person, and he made fewer than 100 posts for the year. (In contrast, A Yewnique Life had 74 posts for 2014 and garnered fewer than 10,000 views. Must. Try. Harder.)

A couple of quibbles:
(1) One must to sign up to Disqus to comment on the blog.

(2) He does not post very often. This is not to hard to understand. The blog is a one-man show and life happens. I get it.

He also has a Facebook page here, where he posts more regularly.

The Upside Down World 

Rebecca Trotter is the woman behind this blog. She is a Christian, a homeschooling mom, a writer, a talker, a thinker, a teacher and an odd duck…(not necessarily in that order).

I like what she has to say about Christianity and evolution. The posts are here.

In case you feel too lazy to click on the link above to the posts on Christianity and Evolution, here are some more links (with titles!) for you to look at:

Why Creationism Does Not Honor God
In Which I Call Creationism Demonic
Teaching Creation Science or ID? A formula for putting your child’s Christian faith at risk.

Provocative titles, no?

I have not read everything on the blog, but so far, I like the ones I’ve read about evolution and Christianity.

She also has a great sense of humour. 🙂

That Other Megan Fox

In case you’ve missed it, a conservative Christian home-schooling mom (CCHSM) named Megan Fox visited a museum and audited it for bias. (Being somewhat culturally illiterate, I didn’t know there was another Megan Fox.) CCHSM Megan Fox posted a 30-minute video of herself going around the museum critiquing the signs and boards.

It is a very long 30 minutes and I watched the whole thing! (I feel I should get a medal or something. Maybe a paracetamol tablet would be better. Or two.)

The description of the video says it all if you don’t/can’t bear to watch the whole thing:

In this episode (“Field Museum”), Megan Fox toured the Chicago Field Museum’s “Evolving Earth” exhibit to audit it for bias. She found many examples of inconsistencies and the Field Museum’s insistence that people support opinion as fact without proof. The Field Museum pushes certain theories as if they are absolute proven law when that is not how the scientific method works. She found enough bias to show that the people who put this exhibit together at the Field Museum pushed an agenda with quasi-religious overtones: the cult of “science” where the “scientists” are more like high priests pushing a religion instead of using the correct scientific method. Aside from having time machines, there is no way these people can be this certain about things they speculate happened millions of years ago before recorded history.

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“I Cannot Come”

Dr Deborah Haarsma of BioLogos recently went to bat for Dr Hugh Ross when Mr Ken Ham criticised him. Dr Haarsma then invited Mr Ham to join her and Dr Ross for dinner. Readers can leave comments on the blog. One can also leave comments on their Facebook page here.

Mr Ham’s response is on his blog here. Mr Ham does NOT allow readers to leave comments. However, he has also posted about it on his Facebook page where people can comment.

 “We have written a number of articles on the AiG website to warn people that compromising God’s Word in Genesis is an authority issue, a gospel issue, and, indirectly, a salvation issue.”

So, there you have it. Belief in Young-Earth Creationism IS a salvation issue after all! Thanks for clearing that up, Mr Ham!

No, I did not miss the preceding ten-letter adverb indirectly. When you think about it, everything ultimately is a salvation issue. Everything will either draw you closer to God, or draw you further away. The question isn’t “Is ‘x’ a salvation issue?” but rather, “How much of a salvation issue is it?” In this case, young-Earth Creationism ranks quite high on Mr Ham’s Salvific Index (SI).

We at AiG are busy “rebuilding a wall.” We are equipping God’s people to defend the Christian faith, and I believe we are doing a great work for God. We are busy being “watchmen”—warning people of those who undermine the authority of the Word of God. Now, of course, I don’t consider Dr. Ross a personal enemy (as Nehemiah considered some of his detractors)—he is actually a pleasant person. But he is what I would call an enemy of biblical authority. He already knows our views, and we know his.

Ken Ham’s response to the dinner invitation? Well, I was reminded of the song, “I Cannot Come” which I learned years ago. I’ve re-written it with different lyrics.

CHORUS:
I cannot come.
I cannot come to the dinner,
Don’t trouble me now.
I am building a wall,
I am keeping my vow.
I must hold to the Bible,
I will not succumb.
Pray, don’t change my mind,
I cannot come.

VERSE 1:
A certain man had a site
Where he taught from God’s Word.
To those who disagreed,
He called them all absurd.
“Compromising Christians,”
Is what they all read.
But when they asked to dine with him,
This is what he said:

CHORUS:
“I cannot come.
I cannot come to the dinner,
Don’t trouble me now.
I am building a wall,
I am keeping my vow.
I must hold to the Bible,
I will not succumb.
Pray, don’t change my mind,
I cannot come.”

VERSE 2:
“God has told us very clearly
How the world we see was made.
He made it all in six days,
By that I won’t be swayed.
I must work to warn others
Not to compromise His Way.
To enemies of His Word,
This is what I say:”

CHORUS

VERSE 3:
“‘Millions of years’ is the Big Lie
Satan wants us to believe.
We must stand firm on the truth
Though he tries hard to deceive.
To be sure, far more dangerous
Are those who claim to follow God
Yet believe in an old earth.
Indeed it’s very odd!”

CHORUS

VERSE 4:
“When my days on earth are over
And I go to meet my Lord.
I am sure He’ll say to me,
‘Child, come to your reward!’
Be encouraged, dear believers!
When sheep-clothed wolves come your way.
If get asked to dinner,
Be certain that you say:”

CHORUS

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